How to Find the Best Laser Vision Correction Procedure

January 4th, 2009

How to Find the Best Laser Vision Correction Procedure

Finding the best laser vision correction procedure might seem a daunting task. Read on to find out more about the different types of laser vision correction surgeries.

The best vision correction procedure for me might not be the best for you because the cornea thickness of everyone’s eyes are different. LASIK might be the first thing that comes to mind when you talk about laser eye surgery, but LASIK may not be the best choice for people with thin corneas.

The Different Types Of Laser Vision Correction Surgery

There are many types of laser vision correction methods available today such as LASIK, LASEK, Epi-LASEK and PRK. PRK was the first type of laser eye surgery developed. During a PRK surgery, the outer corneal layer is scraped away and the excimer laser is used to reshape the cornea. After the surgery, the outer layer will grow back by itself. PRK is recommended as the best laser vision correction procedure for patients with thin corneas.

LASIK is one of the most popular eye surgery procedure today. During LASIK eye surgery, a microkeratome blade is used to cut a corneal flap and an excimer laser is used to reshape the cornea. The flap is then carefully put back in position.

LASEK is commonly used for patients who do not fit the LASIK requirements. Firstly, an alcohol solution is used to loosen the outer layer of the cornea just before the excimer laser is used. After the eye surgery, the outer corneal layer is replaced and a bandage contact lens is worn to protect the eye.

There are also various new vision correction options which do not involve the use of laser. Non laser vision correction procedures include Visian ICL and the use of corneal rings. Corneal rings are small Perspex rings placed inside the cornea to reshape it. Both of these procedures are reversible, unlike laser eye surgery.

Is Laser Vision Correction For You?

The first thing to do before going for laser vision correction is to ask your doctor for advice. You might not be a good candidate for any laser eye surgery if you have any other eye problems. If that is the case, you might want to consider going for a non laser vision correction treatment instead.

Some patients fit the criteria of several different types of vision correction including the new vision correction procedures. In this case, you will need to consider the pros and cons of each type of surgery. You might want to consult two or more surgeons before deciding which is the best vision correction procedure for you. You should ask question like what are the risks of the surgery, what is the recovery time and cost of the different types of vision correction surgery.

Visit LaserEyeSurgeryArchive.com for more information on the different types of laser vision correction methods.


By Jenny Watson
Published: 10/21/2008

San Diego cataract eye surgeon

December 20th, 2008
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Detached Retina

A detached retina is a condition wherein the retina gets separated from the underlying supportive tissue. Find out more about it here as well as what the treatment for retinal detachment is.

A detached retina is a serious condition that occurs when the retina gets separated from the supportive tissue underlying it. The retina loses its ability to function when it becomes detached, and if it is not reattached soon, it can result in permanent loss of vision.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Retinal Detachment?

Some of the warning signs of a detached retina are sudden occurrences of flashes of light, floaters, and spots in the eyes. The vision might get poorer or become blurry. Another symptom is seeing a curtain or a shadow coming across from the side of the eye or coming down from the top. These symptoms may occur all of a sudden, in case the retina detaches suddenly, or it may be a more gradual process as the retina slowly detaches from the tissue supporting it.

A detached retina does not cause any pain. Hence, if the above symptoms occur, an ophthalmologist, or eye doctor, needs to be consulted immediately. Prompt treatment increases the chances of regaining loss of vision.

What are the Causes of a Detached Retina?

A detached retina can be caused by various factors such as a high degree of nearsightedness, or an injury to the face or eye. The eyeballs in people with extreme nearsightedness are longer, accompanied by thinner retinas, which are more susceptible to getting detached. Sometimes, a detached retina may also occur following LASIK surgery performed on very nearsighted people. However, this is rare, according to a study conducted on over 1,500 patients who had had LASIK surgery, just four of them suffered the detachment of their retina.

Retinal detach may also occur due to systemic diseases like sickle cell disease and diabetes, or eye diseases, tumors in the eye, and cataract surgery. When new blood vessels grow under the retina, which can occur in diseases like diabetic retinopathy, it may result in pushing the retina away from its underlying supportive tissue as well. Occasionally, the movement of fluids in the eye can also result in detaching the retina.

How can Retinal Detachment be Treated?

The detached retina can be treated by it being reattached by an eye surgeon. Laser photocoagulation, a technique by which leaking blood vessels can be sealed off and at the same time destroying the growth of new blood vessels, is another method of reattaching the retina.

Silicone oil is also injected in the eye by some eye surgeons so that the detached retina can be kept in place. Pneumatic retinopexy, which is a treatment that is similar, involving a bubble of gas being injected in the vitreous humor, which is the clear and colorless gel that fills the posterior portion of the eyeball, can also be used. This achieves the purpose by the gas bubble expanding and pressing against the retina, thereby holding it against the supportive tissue. After that, photocoagulation or cryosurgery can be used to reattach the retina permanently.

The loss of vision due to retinal detachment can sometimes be regained after treatment. The faster the retinal reattachment procedure is carried out, the higher the chances of recovering vision.

By Rita Putatunda
Published: 1/15/2008

Detached Retina

December 20th, 2008


Detached Retina

A detached retina is a condition wherein the retina gets separated from the underlying supportive tissue. Find out more about it here as well as what the treatment for retinal detachment is.

A detached retina is a serious condition that occurs when the retina gets separated from the supportive tissue underlying it. The retina loses its ability to function when it becomes detached, and if it is not reattached soon, it can result in permanent loss of vision.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Retinal Detachment?

Some of the warning signs of a detached retina are sudden occurrences of flashes of light, floaters, and spots in the eyes. The vision might get poorer or become blurry. Another symptom is seeing a curtain or a shadow coming across from the side of the eye or coming down from the top. These symptoms may occur all of a sudden, in case the retina detaches suddenly, or it may be a more gradual process as the retina slowly detaches from the tissue supporting it.

A detached retina does not cause any pain. Hence, if the above symptoms occur, an ophthalmologist, or eye doctor, needs to be consulted immediately. Prompt treatment increases the chances of regaining loss of vision.

What are the Causes of a Detached Retina?

A detached retina can be caused by various factors such as a high degree of nearsightedness, or an injury to the face or eye. The eyeballs in people with extreme nearsightedness are longer, accompanied by thinner retinas, which are more susceptible to getting detached. Sometimes, a detached retina may also occur following LASIK surgery performed on very nearsighted people. However, this is rare, according to a study conducted on over 1,500 patients who had had LASIK surgery, just four of them suffered the detachment of their retina.

Retinal detach may also occur due to systemic diseases like sickle cell disease and diabetes, or eye diseases, tumors in the eye, and cataract surgery. When new blood vessels grow under the retina, which can occur in diseases like diabetic retinopathy, it may result in pushing the retina away from its underlying supportive tissue as well. Occasionally, the movement of fluids in the eye can also result in detaching the retina.

How can Retinal Detachment be Treated?

The detached retina can be treated by it being reattached by an eye surgeon. Laser photocoagulation, a technique by which leaking blood vessels can be sealed off and at the same time destroying the growth of new blood vessels, is another method of reattaching the retina.

Silicone oil is also injected in the eye by some eye surgeons so that the detached retina can be kept in place. Pneumatic retinopexy, which is a treatment that is similar, involving a bubble of gas being injected in the vitreous humor, which is the clear and colorless gel that fills the posterior portion of the eyeball, can also be used. This achieves the purpose by the gas bubble expanding and pressing against the retina, thereby holding it against the supportive tissue. After that, photocoagulation or cryosurgery can be used to reattach the retina permanently.

The loss of vision due to retinal detachment can sometimes be regained after treatment. The faster the retinal reattachment procedure is carried out, the higher the chances of recovering vision.

By Rita Putatunda
Published: 1/15/2008

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